AUARA states that lack of water will exacerbate the effects of COVID-19 in Africa, where a humanitarian crisis is expected

 

 

 


/COMUNICAE/

The social company had increased its turnover by 63% until February and generated 5 million litres of drinking water in countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America from January to the state of alarm. It is now working on its reactivation, with concern for the most disadvantaged regions, where according to its local partners the pandemic can have devastating effects and cause a humanitarian crisis

 

AUARA is a social company that markets mineral water and allocates 100% of its dividends to facilitate access to safe drinking water in developing countries. In 2019 it managed to generate 12.4 million litres that benefited more than 13,800 people from Africa, Asia and Latin America. This year 2020 was presented as the best of its trajectory: after closing 2019 with a growth of 22% in billing, in the months of January and February it had reached a 63% increase over the same period of the previous year. The week prior to the outbreak of the pandemic was the best in its history, over 90% sales of a year earlier.

From 1 January to 14 March, the day the state of alarm was decreed, AUARA had already built three wells in the Gambia and Benin, generated a total of 5 million litres of water that changed life to more than 900 people (for every litre of mineral water it sells, it is able to generate five liters of drinking water in deprived communities), and saved to women and children 127,500 hours spent on untreated bidons.

However, with the closure of companies, hotels and hospitality and catering establishments, the social company saw its economic activity slow and paralysed the possibility of moving forward with its social projects, which will make it difficult to reach its forecasts of having generated up to 13.6 million litres of drinking water this year, which could have benefited about 20,000 people and saved up to 335,000 hours of long walks carrying heavy drums.

Now, the company is trying to gradually re-establish its usual activity with concern about the effects that COVID-19 will have in developing countries without access to safe drinking water, a vital resource both to supply the sick and to wash the hands that is elemental to prevent contagion. Through the social organizations with which he collaborates on the ground, he received alarming testimonies that pointed out that the direct and indirect effects of the coronavirus will cause a real humanitarian crisis.

“What our partners tell us in countries such as Kenya, Congo or Chad makes us think that the progress of the pandemic in these countries is delayed in terms of industrialized countries, and will soon explode. Its health systems are precarious and only tests are performed. But José Andrés Luque, of the NGO Virunga in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, tell us that they have now begun to perform them, and of every 120 tests, 90 are positive. Given the delicate situation that this country is experiencing, not having water can be devastating,” he says. Antonio Espinosa de los Monteros, CEO and co-founder of AUARA.

 

COVID-19 in a scenario of extreme poverty
The confinement measures adopted by these countries, the paralyzation of their low economic activity (including infrastructure development cooperation projects) and the closure of schools (in many cases managed by international NGOs, and only places where many families have access to safe drinking water, through wells or rainwater harvesting tanks installed through projects financed by AUARA), are a delicate situation for these populations. Que dia se celebra hoy

“We work with very poor communities with incomes of less than €1 a day. The economy has already been affected, and COVID-19 will cause mortality rates to increase by not having their basic needs covered. We must highlight the weakened health system in Kenya and the difficulty in accessing it. Day after day, thousands of people die in Africa from outbreaks of different diseases, and COVID-19 will exacerbate this situation, so now all of our activities focus on humanitarian aid and prevent its contagion and spread,” he explains. Sara Mena, Cooperation Technique Kirira Foundation.

Stop. Teresa Díez, International Cooperation for Africa and Asia NGOs ALBOAN“the scope of the consequences will depend on how the number of infected persons and the new measures taken. Right now, the shortage of water points to maintain the necessary hygiene to prevent the risk of contagion, the disinformation of the disease and the lack of protective material are the most pressing problems of the communities we work with, and women suffer these risks in a differentiated way.”

This brings together the risk of blocking international aid, which many NGOs rely on, whose support for these most disadvantaged communities is now more important if it fits. “Both from Kirira and from ALBOAN we are moved that many of these grants have not yet been convened this year, and they warn that a collapse of the cooperation budgets by the public administrations would put an end to many of their activities,” says Espinosa de los Monteros.

Similarly, restrictions on international travel will prevent the normal development of volunteer programmes this summer, which represents an added concern for many organizations and a great loss of opportunity for many communities who await the arrival of volunteers every year impatiently. This is the case of the NGO Saucecreated in Cambodia by Jesuit Kike Figaredo, who for the first time in 15 years this summer will not be able to celebrate his volunteer program for the children of the communities and villages of the Prefecture, in the north of the country, as explained Teresa Llana, Vice President of Sauce.

In the face of this complex situation, from AUARA they want to recall the importance of continuing to support, both with public funds and with the individual efforts of so many solidarity people, the NGOs working in these developing countries. Now that the COVID-19 will begin to beat them more strongly, they need more than ever to be able to do their work, on which the lives of tens of thousands depend every day.

We must continue to support those who need it most, not only in our country, but also in those who depend on help to move forward. From AUARA, and always thanks to all, they will continue to struggle to extend the fundamental right of all people to have safe drinking water.

Source Comunicae

AUARA states that lack of water will exacerbate the effects of COVID-19 in Africa, where a humanitarian crisis is expected

AUARA states that lack of water will exacerbate the effects of COVID-19 in Africa, where a humanitarian crisis is expected

The social company had increased its turnover by 63% until February and generated 5 million litres of drinking water in countries in Africa, Asia and Latin Ame

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2023-04-11

 

AUARA states that lack of water will exacerbate the effects of COVID-19 in Africa, where a humanitarian crisis is expected
AUARA states that lack of water will exacerbate the effects of COVID-19 in Africa, where a humanitarian crisis is expected

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