Bright cholesterol helps scientists fight heart disease

 

 

 


/COMUNICAE/

James Thierererer, a Johns Hopkins student, commented on how they have been able to conclude using cholesterol to fight heart disease

A recently developed technique that shows fat and protein complexes that block arteries in live fish gave Carnegie researchers, Johns Hopkins University and Mayo Clinic a look at how to study heart disease in action. His research, which is currently being used to find new drugs to combat cardiovascular diseases, is now published in Nature Communications.

 

The fat molecules, also called lipids, like the cholesterol and triglycerides are transported around the circulatory system by a protein called Apolipoprotein-B, or ApoB to abbreviate. These lipid and protein complexes are called lipoproteins, but may be more commonly known as “bad cholesterol.”

Sometimes, this fat and cholesterol transport device stops in its tracks and is embedded in the sides of the blood vessels, forming a dangerous accumulation. These deposits, called plaque, harden the wall of an artery and make it harder for the heart to pump blood, which may eventually lead to a heart attack. SeriesLista.com - Programas de TV, Series, Guía de episodios.

“These lipoproteins that contain ApoB are directly responsible for creating plates in the blood vessels, so learning more about them is essential to combat the global epidemic of cardiovascular disease,” said Chief Author James Thierererer, a graduate student at Johns Hopkins who researches at the Carnegie Embryology Department.

Identifying ways to reduce levels of lipoproteins that form plaque in the bloodstream would save lives. But ApoB is a very large protein complex, making it difficult to study using traditional molecular biology research techniques.

Thus, Steven Farber of Thiererer and Carnegie, together with a colleague from the Mayo Clinic, developed the LipoGlo system, which used state-of-the-art genomic engineering to label ApoB with a brilliant enzyme that is similar to that that that lights fireflies. This allowed them to monitor the movement of the ApoB complexes in zebrafish larvae. Its approach is so sensitive that it can be used to measure lipoproteins in a drop of almost microscopic blood, allowing researchers to perform many of the same medical tests that are performed in humans in tiny larvae of zebrafish.

Bright cholesterol helps scientists fight heart disease

Bright cholesterol helps scientists fight heart disease

James Thierererer, a Johns Hopkins student, commented on how they have been able to conclude using cholesterol to fight heart disease /COMUNICAE/ /COMUNIC

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2023-04-11

 

Bright cholesterol helps scientists fight heart disease
Bright cholesterol helps scientists fight heart disease

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