Sarcogenetic obesity: the consequences of ageing and fattening

 

 

 


/COMUNICAE/

The world's population faces a growing problem: sarcogenetic obesity, a condition linked to increased fat, loss of muscle mass, inadequate feeding and sedentarism. With more than 40% of people over 60 years of age in Spain, David Heber, President of the Herbalife Nutrition Institute (HNI), warns of the urgency of taking public action and, personally, adopting healthy habits from now on.

Sarcopenia is the process of loss of muscle mass resulting from body aging. A term that is graphically illustrated with those pictures of elders walking with difficulty and with visible samples of muscle loss and lozany in general. Aging is not an immediate process, it starts long before: people reach their peak of strength between 25 and 30 years, from there, deterioration accelerates and the effects are visible from the 50s.

 

In recent years, a term has been coined in relation to this, and it is sarcogenetic obesity, a condition characterized by increased fat and loss of muscle mass resulting from many factors, among which stand out the lack of physical exercise, gradual aging and a poor diet. It is presented with low-grade inflammation, insulin resistance and changes in hormone production, according to Dr. David Heber, President of the Herbalife Nutrition Institute (HNI) and Emeritus Professor of Medicine and Health at UCLA. Public health indicators indicate that the condition will also increase as more than 20% of the world ' s population and 40% in Spain will have more than 20 years in 2050, so it is undoubtedly talking about a global problem with common patterns: a poor diet, population ageing, sedentary lifestyle and a growing number of jobs where long periods of sitting are needed.

Although sarcogenetic obesity does not have a single cause, the root of the problem is that there are currently too many overnourished and undernourished people who consume energy-rich and nutrient-poor foods. “If it is not controlled, sarcogenetic obesity can weaken muscles, limit mobility, increase the likelihood of falls and fractures, reduce the quality of life, inhibit independence, and increase the likelihood of metabolic diseases (diabetes, metabolic syndrome) and cardiovascular disease (hypertension, heart attack, stroke)”, Heber warns. Todo sobre Pinganillos

The function of visceral fat
Although the body contains different types of fat, fat around vital organs, known as visceral fat, is closely linked to metabolic syndrome and is a common feature of sarcogenetic obesity. “The danger of visceral fat is that it surrounds the main organs, such as the heart and liver, and stimulates systemic inflammation,” Heber explains. In relation to obesity, individuals may have the same body mass index, but inflammatory states and completely different risk levels due to the difference in the distribution and degree of visceral fat.

How to avoid sarcogenetic obesity and age healthy?
-Strength sports: Regular resistance training, with the use of free weights, weight machines, etc.

- Balanced recipe: Eat a nutrient-rich diet with a variety of fruits, vegetables, cereals, low-fat proteins (soja, low-fat meats, chicken, eggs, nuts, seeds), bioactive compounds (green) and healthy omega-3 fatty acids (fish oil, krill oil).

-Limiting the consumption of calories “empties”: They are calories with few or no nutrients, i.e. they do not contain adequate amounts of fiber, minerals, vitamins etc. Their abuse favors weight gain.

According to David Heber, “we face a global and personal challenge. For the second, a balanced approach to life, incorporating a healthy diet, rest, hydration and regular physical activity, should be affected. To address this global challenge, Heber considers it necessary to develop food recommendations that provide adequate nutrients without excess energy, along with easy-to-use physical activity guidelines for all ages. An urgent response is needed, as global trends in population ageing, sedentary lifestyle and diabetes rates are on the rise.”

Sarcogenetic obesity: the consequences of ageing and fattening

Sarcogenetic obesity: the consequences of ageing and fattening

The world's population faces a growing problem: sarcogenetic obesity, a condition linked to increased fat, loss of muscle mass, inadequate feeding and sedentar

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2023-04-11

 

Sarcogenetic obesity: the consequences of ageing and fattening
Sarcogenetic obesity: the consequences of ageing and fattening

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