Sea of Norway warns that the future of global food sovereignty depends on the oceans

 

 

 


/COMUNICAE/

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Day is celebrated on 16 October. As they recall from the Norwegian Sea Products Council, food sovereignty depends on the Oceans. Sustainable aquaculture will be an essential pillar to ensure consumers high quality proteins at affordable prices

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), millions of people around the world cannot afford healthy food, placing them at a high risk of food insecurity and malnutrition. The projections open up great uncertainties and risks, as the global population is expected to reach 8.5 billion by 2030, 9.7 billion by 2050 and 11.2 billion by 2100. Can the Planet be fed on such a major stage?

 

In a difficult context from the perspective of access to healthy, safe, environmentally friendly and affordable food, debate arises about the sources of supply with the greatest potential, among which fishing is taking a leading role and, especially, aquaculture.

In order to meet the demand for food for the population in 2030, it is necessary to increase food production by 70% and optimize the use of resources with minimal environmental impact. In this sense, even though the oceans cover more than two thirds of the earth's surface, today they represent only 2 percent of the world's livelihood and less than 5 percent of the proteins, according to the director of the Norwegian Sea Products Council in Spain, Björn-Erik Stabell.

“What if the future of global food sovereignty is there, in the sight of all, on the Sea? The time has come to reopen the debate on what can be done to provide healthy and sustainable protein sources to the population. How to produce more food with less resources such as water, while preserving natural spaces and forests, now undergoing enormous pressure for the unstoppable deforestation to increase crop surfaces, both to feed people and intensive livestock,” adds Stabell, who explains that Norway has already gone into action to contribute to a new global food model.

In fact, sustainable fisheries are already one of the pillars of the Norwegian sector, the precursor of demanding control and certification systems to ensure the future and viability of fisheries. As a result, the Coller FAIRR index, which collects the most sustainable producers in the world of proteins, has classified Norwegian aquaculture companies as the best in their class. Of the seven companies classified as “low-risk” for several sustainability-related parameters, three are Norwegian aquaculture companies. Calefactor electrico

The Coller FAIRR index is an annual assessment of global protein producers on their activity according to sustainability parameters such as greenhouse gas emissions, deforestation and biodiversity, water use and scarcity, waste and pollution, antibiotics, animal welfare, working conditions, food security or governance, among other parameters.

The Norwegian coast, which enters the Arctic, provides the ideal conditions for fishing and aquaculture. For thousands of years, Norwegian fishermen have survived thanks to their deep knowledge of the sea of Norway and its inhospitable coast. For the country sector, the well-being of fish is very important. All Norwegian ocean aquaculture facilities are sustainable and have sufficient space for fish to move smoothly, as explained by the Norwegian Sea Products Council.

In fact, only 2.5 per cent of the volume of marine farms is occupied by fish, while 97.5 per cent is reserved for water. This brings together absolute traceability, which brings total tranquility to consumers about the quality of raw materials.

Norwegian aquaculture began in the 1970s, when it began breeding in oceans of the first Norwegian salmon in floating cages. Today, Norwegians continue to use their experience and know how to do in ethology, marine biology and technology to ensure the food health of the products and the future of the sector. In addition, strict measures have been implemented to ensure that the sector is developed respecting ecosystems.

“Since the launch of our first salmon fish farms 40 years ago, Norwegian aquaculture methods have developed rapidly. Today, thanks to the close cooperation between scientists and technicians, we are trying to make progress so that other species, such as cod and fish Balder, are suitable for aquaculture,” says the director.

“Examples of this, the trout of the fjord and the cod of aquaculture, whose production systems have been developed thanks to advanced aquaculture methods being cultivated in open-water farms and fed with specifically formulated feeds to produce a meat of the highest quality,” adds Stabell.

Thus, the world population faces an extreme risk of food shortages. The Oceans can be part of the solution to one of the major problems facing Humanity and Norway can contribute to exporting its model based on innovation, sustainability and excellence.

The Norwegian Sea Products Council (NSC) is directly dependent on the Norwegian Ministry of Trade, Industry and Fisheries and is responsible for publicizing the differential values of national references. The NSC is based in Tromsø and has local offices in 12 of the world's most important Norwegian fish and seafood markets: Sweden, Germany, United Kingdom, France, Portugal, Italy, Brazil, Japan, China, Singapore and USA. In addition to Spain.

Sea of Norway warns that the future of global food sovereignty depends on the oceans

Sea of Norway warns that the future of global food sovereignty depends on the oceans

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Day is celebrated on 16 October. As they recall from the Norwegian Sea Products Council, food

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2023-04-11

 

Sea of Norway warns that the future of global food sovereignty depends on the oceans
Sea of Norway warns that the future of global food sovereignty depends on the oceans

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